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Do Tv Series Increase Femicide Rates?

The most important criterion of the series producers is being watched more. Stories, characters are always determined by this criterion. Those who produce the series are against violence against women. But costumers are not… The responsibility of the producers begins at this point.

 

The tv series sector is perhaps one of the areas where women are most employed. Also in top positions. 

 

The majority of screenwriters are women. Almost all of the drama directors who choose, order and determine their series projects in channels and production companies are women.

Most of the directors and co-directors are the same. The cast also includes women as much as men.

 

The tv series mainly aimed at the taste of female audiences. Because the most popular series are the series that women audiences prefer.

 

Now, with the picture like this, it does seem a little odd that the series encourage and incite violence against women and femicides, right?

 

Is there a series that supports violence against women?

 

The point is, it does not matter whether male or female, none of the channel managers, producers, scriptwriters would say “let’s produce a series that support violence against women in Turkey.”

 

But violence against women and femicides are a reality of the country. There is nothing more natural than handling this issue. In fact not handling is a problem. The thing is the way it is handled and the reason for it.

 

Yes, the creators and decision-makers of the dramas are against violence against women. But not the customers. Men who commit violence against their wives, murder his ex-wife, punish his daughter for a matter of honor are the clients of these series. Almost everyone, who legitimizes violence against women who asks what she did and got the beating, who advices that women should know her place, who grudges freedom to women and considers that it is in the hands of men, are customers of the series.

 

Of course, they are not making series to look nice for these customers. But they are targeting those unfortunately who think they are against violence but actually, they are the ones that waters and grows the seeds of violence. Sadly, also the victims of this violence.

 

A romantic hero could be a murderer?

 

Yes, who produces the series are against violence against women. The most important criterion of the series producers is being watched more. Stories, characters are always determined by this criterion.

 

If the characters who read a lot of books, sensitive to the environment, watch documentaries and have always been against violence would have been watched, you can be sure that tv series would be full of these characters.

But as long as the male characters fight for the girl they like at the first sight and steal the girl’s heart like this, these stories will continue.

That day, the ones making the talking by their fists, they would do the same thing to keep the girl they like. Those who say “I die for your love” may seem romantic at first, and when they lose the love, they attempt to kill.

 

When a woman wants to break up, is the man who understands it more romantic or the one says “either you belong to me or the grave?”

 

Is it the man who loses control, or the man who talks politely with her when he feels jealous?

 

The men we approve by saying, “true lover, a lover to the death, true man” inevitably resort to violence to other men in series, and to women in life at some point. In fact, the signs of future disasters are clear, yet we look the other way.

 

The responsibility of the producers begins at this point. At the expense of being watched more, giving place to these stories and characters, they sprinkle the seeds of violence by clarifying the first signs of violence with love, passion and devotion. Audiences who are their customers, prefer these stories and grow the seeds.

 

The result is that it does not bloom from seeds, but the gush of blood.

 

Along with the screams of the woman who says “I do not want to die…”

 

Translated by Atakan Hüyük